+1-619-354-1118

Design

Design is ingrained into our company's culture and work process, so we'll be sharing ideas, thoughts and trends in this important aspect of developing great business strategies that lead to successful business practices. 

How to Design an Excellent Landing Page

Well-made landing pages are essential for capturing potential leads and growing your audience.

As the name suggests, a landing page is where users “land” once they click one of your links. If you’re striving to generate conversions, you need to make a fantastic first impression each time. Landing pages are a bit different than the other webpages you’ve likely built for your company. They have a clear purpose: they are to get your customers to take the last step in connecting to your brand.

Landing pages are preceded by a call to action. You need to entice people browsing or searching to click on your links or ads. The landing page tells them they’re where they need to be after clicking. Relevant landing pages are crucial to generating more conversions to your brand.

10 Web Design Trends & Predictions For 2017 (Infographic)

Beautiful and informative infographic about the future trends of Web Design for 2017

The industry of website design and web development are constantly changing, and it's important to take note so that businesses small or big take notice and adapt their business websites accordingly.

Our agency Bloominari, a San Diego web design, digital marketing and creative company is ready to take on the new year to help small businesses with making sure their web precence is up-to-date and looking always professional, modern and attractive in order to attract new clients and grow their business online. Be sure to also take a look at our related post on "What will be the most important digital marketing trends in 2016-2017?"

10 Signs Your Site Needs A Redesign

Let’s have a little chat about your business’s website.

Did you hire a web design agency to build your business’s website when the company first launched, but no one has updated the website since?

If you visit your website on a cell phone or tablet, does it look the exact same as it does on a computer’s browser, making it difficult to view the text and navigate the site?

Does your site have very high bounce rates or very short session durations?

Graphic & Web Design Trends 2016 Infographic

Design involves planning, creating and updating. Design also touches many disciplines from information architecture to user interface design to color theory. Every design today utilizes a range of design philosophies from persisting design principles to the most recent design trends.

Why, How and Where to Use Infographics

Humans have five core senses. 

But they’re not all equally important when it comes to marketing.

The majority of information that gets presented to the brain is information we gather through our sense of sight. Our brains are able to process images 60,000 times faster than text. It is also estimated that 65 percent of people are visual learners. So we can safely conclude that appealing to a person’s visual intrigue is most likely the best way to garner their attention.

Infographics are reportedly 30 times more likely to be read than text - including this blog post. Are you surprised? Infographics, when used for marketing your business, can help you increase the communication of data, increase engagement on social media and increase website traffic. It’s best to take advantage of this information and use it when marketing your business.

Branding: Colors & Typography Intro

When starting your business from the ground up you may already have any idea of what it is you want as a logo. But you may not be sure on what color or typography you want to use. You may just think it’s not as important when it definitely is.

So why is color so important?

In a past blog we talked about how different brands have their “special color” and how we react to them. Scientists have proven that color evokes an emotional reaction in us.

The Shocking Truth About Website Design

As the old saying goes, you should never judge a book by its cover. 

While this is an appropriate adage to live your personal life by, the reality is most businesses are in fact judged by their cover, and judged quite harshly at that. 

And by a business’s cover, of course, I mean their website. 

  • Forty-eight percent (48%) of customers—essentially 1 out of every 2 people—use a company website as the #1 factor in determining a business’s credibility. 
  • Additionally, Ninety-four percent (94%) of customers said that dated, ugly, or confusing website design was the main reason they did not choose to go with a business. 
The Structure of an Ad Agency

Advertising agencies are self-contained structure. Within the advertising agency, there are departments and people, all essential to the movement of client projects and overall success of the agency. One department cannot work without another, as they are all interconnected and dependent on each other.

Think of an ad agency as a chair. The agency as whole, as an organization, is the seat. It’s the part of the chair people take most notice of; it’s where clients sit and relax. The departments are the legs, the support system. Like a chair, if one leg fails, the whole agency falls. In most agencies, these four legs, or departments:

Creative

Creative is responsible for creating the ads, from concept to final product. Within the creative department, there are designer and art directors, who are responsible for visual elements, and copywriter, who are responsible for coming up with wording. The accounts department creates a “creative brief”, or a document communicating the client’s project requests, which is then given to the creative department. The creatives then execute a concept, based on the creative brief, with several rounds of client revisions. Once the project exceeds clients’ expectations, the creative department packages the project in digital formats, which can be used for printing, TV broadcasting, digital advertising, and so on.

Accounts Department

The accounts department acts as the liaison between the agency and the client. If the client requests a change to a project, account executives are responsible for passing on the information to the creative department. For example, if the client requests a color revision on an ad, the account executive assigned to that client, will inform the designer of the requested change. Once the revisions have been made by the creative department, the account executive will deliver the revised project the client, until completion.

Coloring Your Brand

Branding is no easy feat.

There are an exponential number of elements to take into consideration: logo, typeface, messaging, strategy, purpose, value, audience, the list goes on. And while all of these items are essential to building a solid brand, one items reigns highest on the list. Color.

Why color? Color is the first thing our eyes see.

What is a Mood Board and why you should be using one

Maybe you’ve heard of a mood board. Maybe you haven’t.

If a fun tool used to gather artistic inspiration comes to mind then you are on the right track. If you picture some sort of hybrid weegie board, you might be a little further from the mark…

Whatever your impression of a mood board might be, it is something you should get to know and love. Making one can be quite fun all in its own, and designing/building/creating anything in a team without one can lead your projects down a serious path of misdirection.

A moodboard is an assortment of images, textures, colors and fonts all arranged together and used to define the overall style or ‘mood’ of your project.

Why You Need One

If you create things for a living then I’m sure you already use cool stuff you’ve seen as inspiration. A mood board is simply a more polished, cohesive collection of those cool things.

They are used all across the board (maybe pun intended). Creatives working in design, branding, photography, fashion, film, interior decorating and even wedding planning all use mood boards.

Be aware though, mood boards serve a broader purpose than pure inspiration.

If your work is for a client, then assembling a mood board together is how you let him or her get involved in the design process without them sticking a nose in trying to play art director.

It is how you guarantee that you are all on the ‘same page’ with the direction of the project.

You know that feeling in the pit of your stomach when you present a beautifully-designed piece of work only to have it unapologetically rejected because it didn’t have the right ‘feel’. Agreeing ahead of time on the elements in the mood board and having your client contribute images they like is how you all are in agreement of what that ‘feel’ should be.

How To Make One

There really isn’t a definitive structure to making a ‘correct’ mood board.

Usually the elements are arranged in some sort of collage fashion. Whether they are strictly aligned to a grid or more loosely placed is dependent on your own style.

Page 1 of 2
×

×
×