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Beautiful and informative infographic about the future trends of Web Design for 2017

The industry of website design and web development are constantly changing, and it's important to take note so that businesses small or big take notice and adapt their business websites accordingly.

Our agency Bloominari, a San Diego web design, digital marketing and creative company is ready to take on the new year to help small businesses with making sure their web precence is up-to-date and looking always professional, modern and attractive in order to attract new clients and grow their business online. Be sure to also take a look at our related post on "What will be the most important digital marketing trends in 2016-2017?"

Published in Design

Design involves planning, creating and updating. Design also touches many disciplines from information architecture to user interface design to color theory. Every design today utilizes a range of design philosophies from persisting design principles to the most recent design trends.

Published in Design

If within budget, key branded photography for your marketing materials is a winning marketing tactic. Never underestimate the power of a good visual...as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words!

Photography and visuals help to quickly communicate to your target market, and can create a magical, speedy sense of connection. With a photograph, a consumer can quickly understand why they should be interested in something, how they make connect with it, where it fits into their life and, essentially, whether or not they should take that call-to-action to keep reading, click, sign up or more.

Published in Marketing & Strategy
Tuesday, 28 April 2015 17:12

The Structure of an Ad Agency

Advertising agencies are self-contained structure. Within the advertising agency, there are departments and people, all essential to the movement of client projects and overall success of the agency. One department cannot work without another, as they are all interconnected and dependent on each other.

Think of an ad agency as a chair. The agency as whole, as an organization, is the seat. It’s the part of the chair people take most notice of; it’s where clients sit and relax. The departments are the legs, the support system. Like a chair, if one leg fails, the whole agency falls. In most agencies, these four legs, or departments:

Creative

Creative is responsible for creating the ads, from concept to final product. Within the creative department, there are designer and art directors, who are responsible for visual elements, and copywriter, who are responsible for coming up with wording. The accounts department creates a “creative brief”, or a document communicating the client’s project requests, which is then given to the creative department. The creatives then execute a concept, based on the creative brief, with several rounds of client revisions. Once the project exceeds clients’ expectations, the creative department packages the project in digital formats, which can be used for printing, TV broadcasting, digital advertising, and so on.

Accounts Department

The accounts department acts as the liaison between the agency and the client. If the client requests a change to a project, account executives are responsible for passing on the information to the creative department. For example, if the client requests a color revision on an ad, the account executive assigned to that client, will inform the designer of the requested change. Once the revisions have been made by the creative department, the account executive will deliver the revised project the client, until completion.

Published in Design

This is one of the greatest questions small businesses ask themselves when they’re in need of building their online web presence. As most of you already know, building a website for a company is a crucial step in order to exist in today’s digital world.

Today, if your company doesn’t have a website, it’s is just as bad as if your office doesn’t have a phone number where they can reach you. In short, building a small business website or personal web page is crucial to the marketing and branding of you or your company.

Deciding whether to build your own website or hire a professional designer?

There’s a couple of things you should think about and consider before you jump to any conclusions. Let’s take a look:

  1. Do you have the time to build your own website?
  2. Do you have the technical knowledge and/or patience to learn how to build your own website using existing online tools?
  3. Are you willing to sacrifice a website’s quality and features for your time and money?

Based on your answers to those three key questions, you should be quickly able to decide who should build your website. If you time is more valuable to grow your business and brand, for sure hire someone. If you’ve got time to spare and want to be adventurous and save some money try to build your own!

Let’s analyze a couple of scenarios:

Recently we unveiled for you part 1 of our feature 20 Unignorable Rules of Graphic Design adopted from Timothy Samara’s Visual Elements: A Graphic Style Manual. If you missed it you can find it here. In this second half of the article, I will break down for you ten more unignorable rules that constitute graphic design. As always remember that these rules aren’t set to never be broken no matter what. Rather, when you do choose to break them do so with a specific intent in mind to better convey your message. On that note, happy designing and let’s get started! 

11. Be Universal; It’s Not Just About You

Artists often create for themselves, but as a designer you create for everyone else. Your audience must know what it is you are trying to say with those shapes and lines and colors, not just a few ‘enlightened’ folks. Your designs are ultimately being used to promote a concert or relay instructions in a manual or something else communicative. While you should most definitely leave your own creative mark on every piece of work, you will be ultimately judged by how effectively you convey the message, not how pretty your piece looks.

12. Squish and Separate

If it’s your intention to make your piece look dull and lifeless, then by all means align everything with equal proportions using the same color, shape and typeface. On the of chance you want to give it some actual life (which hint, hint you should always be doing), move things arounds and squish some elements together. Give the viewer’s eyes some curves to follow by creating a breathing, flowing piece ramp with contrast and density.

Published in Design

A person’s impression of what’s ‘good’ or ‘bad’ design generally is picked up through education and experience. Accumulated from the multitude of designers and critics who came before them, most criteria inevitably boils down to personal preference. Some are aesthetically based, like “asymmetry is more beautiful than symmetry,” or “a neutral typeface is all you need.” Other factors are more functional, such as “never reversing a serif typeface on a solid background if it’s less than 10 points.”

All rules are meant to be broken, but they should never be completely ignored. This set is not intended to be a definitive checklist to making good design. It should, however, provide points to be considered in every creative project you take on. Adapted from Timothy Samara’s Design Elements: A Graphic Style Manual, here are

20 unignorable rules of graphic design

 

1. Have A Concept

Every, every, every design you ever make must have a meaning behind it. Plain and Simple. It doesn’t matter how beautiful your art is or how creative your graphics look. If your design doesn’t contain a story, an idea or a message you are trying to convey, it isn’t graphic design. It’s just pretty pictures on a page. Tell us something with your work.

2. Communicate, Don’t Decorate

Form carries meaning. No matter how simple or abstract that form may be, form that doesn’t match up communicates conflicting messages to your audience. Experiment with different shapes, details, colors and effects, and explore how they all can work together to support your message. Without keeping your message in mind, your work runs the risk of simply becoming a collage of graphics no longer qualifying as communicative design. Everything the viewer sees should be there for a reason.

Published in Design

Every small business wishes that it had unlimited resources to do whatever it desires in order to grow. Whether a company wishes to create a new product, build things faster, make bigger marketing campaigns, attend more tradeshows, or develop a bigger brand, the reality is that everyone’s resources of time and money are always limited.

With this in mind, the constant question businesses ask themselves is: How can we stretch every minute of our time and every penny of our dollars to still show the same power, products quality, brand equity, leadership, expertise, and trusted perception as our main competitors who probably have larger budgets, bigger teams, maybe more experience and been around for longer?

Want to learn how a small business can be perceived to be greater than it really is?

The short answer is: Use the power of today’s digital marketing age, quality design, technology and branding techniques to make everyone believe that your company is one of the “big players” in your industry. Let’s take a deeper look at how this can be achieved.

It’s all about perception...

Friday, 20 December 2013 01:47

Espacio Inteligente

Published in Ads & Banners
Friday, 20 December 2013 00:36

Studio Dos

Published in Logos
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