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Wednesday, 31 December 2014 16:00

Why Do People Click on Google ads?

Curiosity.

To sum it all up in one word, the #1 thing that drives people to click on an ad is curiosity. Not benefits. Not a unique or original feature. Curiosity.

You cannot sell a product in 40 characters. You cannot even differentiate your company from the rest of the pack in that short window. You can however spark curiosity in that brief of an instant.

Curiosity is a fundamental human emotion. It burrows way deeper than any logic-based purchasing emotion. In your prospect’s mind, it no longer is a question of how this product can benefit me. They forget they are even trying to buy something and the issue becomes: “I need to know the answer to this or it will eat at me for the rest of eternity.”

It’s funny when you put it that way but it’s true. Everybody has ADD online. You really only waste 2 seconds of your life if you land on a page that doesn’t fit your fancy, so people are pretty open to clicking on something if it looks even mildly interesting.

Think of it like an ad for the ad. As I said before, 40 characters is not enough space to sell anything. Your landing page is where you really start to make the sale (if you are marketing online correctly anyway). With the Google ad all you are trying to do is get the click.

It really is no different than an interesting headline on the front page of a newspaper. The headline isn’t supposed to detail the story. It is supposed to catch your attention enough so you start reading.

Now imagine you are the prospect. You just searched something like “Accounting firm in San Diego” or something else drab into Google and a page of relevant results appear.

They all look pretty much the same. “Save money on your return! Set up a free consultation!”

Then bunched up on the top and to the right you see even more options (which are the Google ads) and are also all very relevant choices to your “Accounting firm in San Diego” search. There are so many options online that they all start to blend together. How do you choose one option over the other?

Then you see one ad that reads something like: “Vacation to Hawaii from Savings!

This man took his family of 4 to paradise for a week all from this one new tax deduction!”

That looks way more interesting and still relevant enough to the “Accounting firm in San Diego” search. “I pay taxes,” you think to yourself, “maybe I too can qualify for this deduction.” Worst-case scenario, if it isn’t what you expect you click the back button and try out another link.

But you land on a page and see a smiling family at the beach. You start to read a story of how the CPAs at the firm we able to rework a new client’s tax return and factor in new deductions amounting to thousands of dollars. Their savings were so high that they vacationed that summer to Hawaii.

Before you even know it (and really in a matter of seconds) you’ve gone from clicking on an intriguing ad and getting absorbed into a story about Hawaii to reading about a prestigious accounting firm, the services they offer, pricing, etc.

All because you were the tinniest bit curious about something you saw.

This is a very rough example from the top of my head but it illustrates my point well enough. If you want your online advertising campaigns to have any real success, there needs to be an extra element involved. Curiosity is the #1 element in generating additional clicks.

If you are ready to step up your online advertising campaigns but still need some guidance, get in touch with the marketing pros at Bloominari and they will help you develop an effective strategy based from proven tactics.

marketing lead generation

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Erik Rosner

Content Strategist

Erik brings a unique talent for writing to our team, using his creative skills in creating and curating content to encourage user engagement in our client's brands and ours. 

Find me on: Team Page | LinkedIn | Google+

 

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